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Ms. Xavier Gives a Lesson on Informal Education

Ms. Amanda Xavier“A Lesson on Informal Language”
Hi, have you ever wondered why, much like Rodney Dangerfield, you get no respect from your teachers or your after-school job?  Well it might be because you are using inappropriate language in the classroom.  No, I don’t mean cursing.  I mean informal language.  If you walk up to your teacher and say, “Yo Miss, yesterday was hella bad and that homework was mad hard so I didn’t do it, aight?”  You probably get no respect.  Or if you say to your boss, “Son, I was at a sick party yesterday so I ain’t coming in today,” chances are you get no respect but do get fired.
When you’re in a formal situation like school or a job you need to speak with formal language.  So saying, “Excuse me Ms. Xavier but yesterday I was sick and my baby sister was up all night crying.  Also I didn’t understand the lesson so I couldn’t do the homework,” is going to you a lot more sympathy and probably an extension on the deadline for your work.
You have to learn to understand the distinction between intended audience and language.  Informal situations like recess, lunch, or hanging out with friends after school is perfect for informal language.  But when speaking with someone in authority, formal language is your best bet.
And this doesn’t just apply to what you say.  Writing, “Hi my name is Amanda and I going to tell you why Harry Potter is the best hero ever!” makes me think we’re at a slumber party.  Whenever you write something for a teacher, make sure you use formal language as well.  A better way to start an essay about Harry Potter is, “There have been many heroes throughout the ages in literature, but few call to mind the unwavering bravery in the face of evil as Harry Potter does to my mind the best hero ever.”
So to sum up: It was a pleasure to illuminate you today on the differences between formal and informal language.  Peace out!

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